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Viking Jewellery

Silver b3 | Celtic, Saxon & Viking Jewellery and Gifts | Viking Jewellery

Viking Jewellery

A selection of Hand crafted Viking Jewellery, the inspiration and designs of which are taken from historical records and original archaeological discoveries of Viking jewellery pieces, art and mithology.
Viking Serpent Brooches

Viking Serpent Brooches

Ref: MBP308


Price: 24.95

Quantity:


An antiqued Pewter brooch in a Viking style with interlacing serpents. The brooch is set with Lapis and Fire Opal glass cabochons creating a stunning array of colour.

It attaches to a garment by way of a pin with locking, safety catch giving you a secure fixing.

Approx 7cm long.

Thor's Hammer (Pewter)

Thor's Hammer (Pewter)

Ref: PN2053


Price: 19.95

Quantity:

Solid pewter Thor's Hammer with Celtic knotwork detail on the handle and Vegvisir symbol on the hammer head. Comes on a waxed cotton adjustable cord.

Thor was the Norse god of thunder who guarded Asgard, the celestial stronghold of the Aesir. Mjolnir, the hammer Thor wielded as his primary weapon was said to work like a boomerang and return to him when thrown. The hammer was also used in rituals of consecration and hallowing.

Width: 17mm Height: 40mm

Thor's Hammer (Bronze)

Thor's Hammer (Bronze)

Ref: BZP992


Price: 36.00

Quantity:

Solid Bronze Thor's Hammer with Celtic knotwork detail on the handle and Vegvisir symbol on the hammer head. Comes on a waxed cotton adjustable cord.

Thor was the Norse god of thunder who guarded Asgard, the celestial stronghold of the Aesir. Mjolnir, the hammer Thor wielded as his primary weapon was said to work like a boomerang and return to him when thrown. The hammer was also used in rituals of consecration and hallowing.

Width: 17mm Height: 40mm

Viking Annular Brooch

Viking Annular Brooch

Ref: PB03


Price: 17.95

Quantity:


Pewter openwork Viking annular brooches with an embossed design. Secures to a garment by way of a pin with locking, safety catch.

The silver original of this brooch is presently in the Museum of Northern Antiquities at Copenhagen.

It is a true representation of early Scandinavian art in the 9th century AD and has an oriental influence. It was found on the Isle of Bjorko, Sweden.


Finish: Pewter
Width: 92mm Height: 32mm

Viking Travellers Charm Pendants

Viking Travellers Charm Pendants

Ref: PN683


Price: 15.00

Quantity:


Travellers charm pendant - Pewter pendant with runic inscription on the which back translates as: Venture forth, safe from harm.

Adjustable black leather thong.

The design on the front of this pendant was taken from the Lillbjärs picture stone found in Stenkyrka, Gotland, Sweden and it dates back to the 8th century CE.

Finish: Pewter
Width: 20mm Height: 41mm
Thong length (max.): 30 inch (76cm)

Bronze Viking Travelers Charm Pendant

Bronze Viking Travelers Charm Pendant

Ref: BZP50


Price: 31.00

Quantity:


The travellers charm pendant (also known as Lillbjärs picture stone) made in bronze comes with embossed detail on front and a Runic inscription on the back which translates as: Venture forth, safe from harm.

Comes on an adjustable black leather thong.

The design on the front of this pendant was inspired by the Lillbjärs picture stone found in Stenkyrka, Gotland, Sweden and it dates back to the 8th century CE.


Finish: Bronze
Width: 21mm Height: 43mm
Thong length (max.): 30 inch (76cm)

Helm of Awe Viking Pendants

Helm of Awe Viking Pendants

Ref: PN1024


Price: 16.95

Quantity:


Helm of Awe pendant. This pewter pendant depicts the Helm of Awe symbol hanging on an adjustable leather thong.

The Helm of Awe is one of the most powerful protective Viking symbols. It was used not only for the purpose of protection from illness, but also to encourage people suffering from depression or anxiety.

In Norse mythology it was said that the Helm of Awe symbol was worn between the eyes to induce fear in your enemies, and to protect you against the abuse of power.

Finish: Pewter
Diameter - 35mm

Bronze Vegvisir Viking Pendant

Bronze Vegvisir Viking Pendant

Ref: BZP972


Price: 29.00

Quantity:


The Vegvisir (Nordic for sign post or wayfinder, and pronounced: VEGG-vee-seer) is a symbol of protection and guidance believed to be used as a compass by Vikings.

The Vegvisir is also known as the runic compass, or the Viking / Nordic compass made of eight Viking rune staves.

The Vegvisir is a symbol described only in one modern Icelandic collection of spells, from the Huld manuscript.

That book has nothing more than this one sentence to say about it:

"If this sign is carried, one will never lose one's way in storms or bad weather, even when the way is not known."

Made from Cornish bronze this pendant comes on an adjustable waxed cotton thong.


Finish: Bronze
Size: Diameter 28mm

Thor Amulet Pendants

Thor Amulet Pendants

Ref: PN74


Price: 16.00

Quantity:


Thor amulet pendant - pewter representation of Thor's hammer on an adjustable black leather thong.

Amulets are worn for protection. This amulet is connected with the Pagan religion of the Scandinavians.
Thor was the mightiest god waging war against the giants whom he killed with his hammer.

At the same time he was a god of the home, hallowing marriage and purifying funerals with his hammer.

The original hammer was found in Sweden and made in silver.


Finish: Pewter
Width: 26mm Height: 46mm
Thong length (max.): 30 inch (76cm)

Bronze Thor Amulet Pendant

Bronze Thor Amulet Pendant

Ref: BZP52


Price: 32.00

Quantity:

Bronze Thor amulet pendant with embossed detail on adjustable black leather thong.

Amulets are worn for protection. This amulet is connected with the Pagan religion of the Scandinavians.

Thor was the mightiest god waging war against the giants whom he killed with his hammer. At the same time he was a god of the home, hallowing marriage and purifying funerals with his hammer.

The original hammer was found in Sweden and made in silver.


Finish: Bronze
Size: Width: 26mm Height: 46mm
Thong length (max.): 30 inch (76cm)

Viking Wolf Pendants

Viking Wolf Pendants

Ref: PN1072


Price: 17.00

Quantity:


Viking wolf pendant - this beautifully detailed Viking wolf pendant features Celtic knotwork and comes on an adjustable leather thong.

In Norse mythology the wolf is one of the most feared creatures. The wolf villain Fenrir was said to have killed Odin in the event of Ragnarok!

Wolfs are said to have a deep connection with instincts and intuition, are very intelligent and very courageous.

The symbol of the wolf is often given to people to help them through troubled times.

Finish: Pewter
Width: 30mm height: 26mm

Thors Hammer Pendants

Thors Hammer Pendants

Ref: PN965


Price: 15.95

Quantity:


A large pewter Thors hammer pendant with embossed Celtic design featuring a triscele.

This pendant is associated with ancient Scandinavian religious beliefs. Thor was the mightiest god, waging war against the giants whom he killed with his hammer. At the same time he was a god of the home, hallowing marriage and purifying funerals.

The triscele is commonly found in late Celtic art and is thought to have some Roman influence, although fine examples are found in the native art of Ireland and Scotland.

It is thought to represent the three realms of Celtic lore: the past, the present and the future. One of the most popular of Ancient Celtic designs, it survived well into the Christian period, probably because it could also be considered to represent the Holy Trinity.


Width: 40mm Height: 45mm Comes on an adjustable leather thong.

Viking Serpent Hairslide

Viking Serpent Hairslide

Ref: PH683


Price: 25.00

Quantity:


Viking serpent hairslide - a solid pewter Viking serpent hair-slide depicting two serpents in a knotwork design. Comes with an American walnut wooden pin.

The American black walnut wooden pin on the back holds the hair tightly to prevent the hairslide from slipping out.

In Celtic lore the serpent is the image of light, life and divine wisdom. Coming from deep within the earth, it was believed to hold secrets and to be the guardian of hidden riches, metals, medical cures and esoteric knowledge.


Finish: Pewter and American Walnut
Width: 64mm Height: 40mm

Viking History in Anglo Saxon Britain

In 793 came the first recorded Viking raid, where 'on the Ides of June the harrying of the heathen destroyed God's church on Lindisfarne, bringing ruin and slaughter' (The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle).

Vikings continued to make regular raids around the coasts of England, looting treasure and other goods, and capturing people as slaves. Monasteries were often targeted, for their precious silver or gold chalices, plates, bowls and crucifixes.

Gradually, the Viking raiders began to stay, first in winter camps, then settling in land they had seized, mainly in the east and north of England.

From around 860AD onwards, Vikings stayed, settled and prospered in Britain, becoming part of the mix of people who today make up the British nation. Our names for days of the week come mainly from Norse gods – Tuesday from Tiw or Týr, Wednesday from Woden (Odin), Thursday from Thor and so on. Many of their other words have also become part of English, for example egg, steak, law, die, bread, down, fog, muck, lump and scrawny.

Outside Anglo-Saxon England, to the north of Britain, the Vikings took over and settled Iceland, the Faroes and Orkney, becoming farmers and fishermen, and sometimes going on summer trading or raiding voyages. Orkney became powerful, and from there the Earls of Orkney ruled most of Scotland. To this day, especially on the north-east coast, many Scots still bear Viking names.

To the west of Britain, the Isle of Man became a Viking kingdom. The island still has its Tynwald, or ting-vollr (assembly field), a reminder of Viking rule - see The Viking Thing. In Ireland, the Vikings raided around the coasts and up the rivers. They founded the cities of Dublin, Cork and Limerick as Viking strongholds.

Meanwhile, back in England, the Vikings took over Northumbria, East Anglia and parts of Mercia. In 866 they captured modern York (Viking name: Jorvik) and made it their capital. They continued to press south and west. The kings of Mercia and Wessex resisted as best they could, but with little success until the time of Alfred of Wessex, the only king of England to be called ‘the Great'.

King Alfred and the Danes (Vikings)

King Alfred ruled from 871-899 and after many trials and tribulations (including the famous story of the burning of the cakes!) he defeated the Vikings at the Battle of Edington in 878. After the battle the Viking leader Guthrum converted to Christianity. In 886 Alfred took London from the Vikings and fortified it. The same year he signed a treaty with Guthrum. The treaty partitioned England between Vikings and English. The Viking territory became known as the 'Danelaw'. It comprised the north-west, the north-east and east of England. Here, people would be subject to Danish laws. Alfred became king of the rest.

Alfred's grandson, Athelstan, became the first true King of England. He led an English victory over the Vikings at the Battle of Brunaburh in 937, and his kingdom for the first time included the Danelaw. In 954, Eirik Bloodaxe, the last Viking king of York, was killed and his kingdom was taken over by English Earls.

The final Viking invasion of England came in 1066, when Harald Hardrada sailed up the River Humber and marched to Stamford Bridge with his men. His battle banner was called Land-waster. The English king, Harold Godwinson, camped with his army on the South coast awaiting the imminent invasion of William, Duke of Normandy (later to be known as William the Conqueror) was forced to march North with his army to meet the threat from Hardrada, and in a long and bloody battle emerged victorious. The English had repelled the last invasion from Scandinavia.

Silver b3 | Celtic, Saxon & Viking Jewellery and Gifts | Viking Jewellery

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